‘Fast Fashion’ hotline wants to cure your shopping addiction


Stay away from that sales counter.

Online retailer thredUP has teamed up with “Stranger Things” star Priya Ferguson to launch a new phone service designed to stop fast-fashion lovers from recklessly snapping up cheap clothes.

ThredUP created the initiative after a survey of 2,000 Gen Z Americans found that one-third felt addicted to fast fashion — which includes affordable and trendy clothing sold by the country’s top retailers, including Zara and Forever 21.

“Hey Priya, you’re on the ‘Fast Fashion Confessional Hotline,’ which means you want to get undressed in fast fashion,” Ferguson, 15, said in a recorded message after calling 1-855-THREDUP. .

“You and the planet deserve better,” the actress said before giving callers three different options.

Ferguson is seen promoting the new hotline for thredUP.  of "Strange things" The Star recorded a series of messages for stores calling the number.
Ferguson is seen promoting the new hotline for thredUP. The “Stranger Things” star recorded a series of messages for consumers calling his number.
addition
Ferguson gained fame after joining the cast of the group "Strange things" It's back in 2017.
Ferguson He rose to fame after joining the cast of “Stranger Things” in 2017.
WireImage

“No girl if you’re on the edge. Press 1,” Ferguson asks, leading to a speech from the star about why the number is bad for fast fashion.

If the caller presses 2, you can hear Ferguson explain why thrift shopping is the best option for the environment.

Meanwhile, the starlet shares her own quick fashion horror story with the option to press 3 results to get the caller to put their clothes back on the rack.

Fast fashion clogs landfills and is widely known to be bad for the environment - but people can't stop buying.  In the year  A 2018 survey of 2,000 Britons found that they were buying twice as much clothes as they were a decade ago.
Fast fashion clogs landfills and is widely known to be bad for the environment – but people can’t stop buying. In the year A 2018 survey of 2,000 Britons found that they were buying twice as much clothes as they were a decade ago.

Erin Wallace of Integrated Marketing thredUP’s Erin Wallace of Integrated Marketing told Vogue Business, “We’ve been surprised by the number of people who say they’re really aware of their personal consumption habits and their impact on the planet.

Many young people are buying clothes for their social media feeds before diving into the designs after wearing them a few times. The clothes are then thrown into the trash, often ending up in a landfill.

In the year  In 2019, labs were seen working in a garment factory in South Pakistan.  It is cheap and affordable to make fast fashion.
In the year In 2019, labs were seen working in a garment factory in South Pakistan. It is cheap and affordable to make fast fashion.
Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

In the year In 2018, The Post’s survey of 2,000 Britons found that most of them buy twice as much clothing as they did a decade ago.

According to the survey, one in 10 respondents wore their clothes only 3 times in a photo posted on Facebook and Instagram.

Meanwhile, one in 5 respondents admitted to stuffing unwanted clothes in the trash instead of donating or recycling them.



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