King Culture, Inc., and Emory Hillandale Hospital collaborate on a health podcast series


For a variety of reasons, men in the United States report poorer health than women. Beliefs about masculinity and manhood that are deeply rooted in culture and supported by society play a role in shaping behavioral patterns in ways that have serious consequences for men’s health, according to the National Library of Medicine. Traditionally, men are expected to project strength, individuality and autonomy, but avoid showing emotion or vulnerability that could be interpreted as weakness.

In an effort to change these paradigms, King Culture, Inc., a nonprofit that develops young men as selfless leaders, is collaborating with Emory Hillandale Hospital and other health care providers on an educational podcast series called “Plan for Longevity.” The series aims to equip men with knowledge and skills needed to live productive lives and leave a legacy for generations to come. The series promotes open dialogue about understanding family history, the importance of prevention and changing some of the detrimental patterns related to poor health outcomes.

Headshot of Domonic Purviance

“For most men, health is simply not something we like to talk about. But if we are going to be there for those who need us the most, we are going to have to make physical and mental health a priority. This is personal for me,” says King Culture, Inc., co-founder Domonic Purviance.

“Dealing with several health challenges over the years, I learned so many lessons that I want to pass on. Through this work, I am optimistic that we can help change the narrative. I hope that men will not only prioritize their health more, but will be equipped to make decisions while they’re young that will ultimately lead to better health outcomes long-term.”

Purviance goes on to say, “Working together with Emory Hillandale Hospital and other health care professionals allows us to present accurate and inspiring presentations to support our plan for longevity.”

Headshot of Yvette Broughton

Promoting better community health is also a labor of love for co-founder Yvette Broughton.

“I lost both of my parents within a year of each other and I believe prevention could have given them more time. I want to help families survive and thrive together for as long as possible,” says Broughton.

“Navigating health care for yourself or being an advocate for another isn’t easy, but an integral part of being a selfless leader. It’s never too early to prepare for or prevent loss.”

“Working with King Culture, Inc., to present this vital information is a win for everyone,” says Emory Hillandale Hospital Vice President of Operations Joe D’Angelo. “There are many misconceptions in the community about when, where and how to receive medical treatment. The podcasts will allow us to distribute the correct information to those who need it most.”

D’Angelo speaks about “Navigating the Healthcare System” in one episode that is available here.

Andrew Dixon, MD, with Northwest Nephrology Clinic, discusses why “Prevention Is Part of the Plan” in another episode available here.

Other episodes to be released in the coming weeks feature chief hospitalist Ovid Barrow, MD, and surgical services specialty director Corey Brown.

In addition to the podcast series, King Culture’s “Plan for Longevity” initiative includes a health inventory survey, which allows men to assess how well they manage their health. The initiative also provides helpful insights to assist men in developing their personal health strategy. For more details, see the Plan for Longevity website.

Subscribe to the series and receive notifications about new episodes at youtube.com/kingcultureinc. Tune in each week to follow the conversations and share them with the men in your life.

Follow us on Facebook @kingcultureinc ​​@emoryhillandale or Instagram @kingcultureinc.



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