A New Times report hails the new communist Chinese fashion style as ‘cool’ with Xi Jinping as a ‘fashion influencer’.

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New York Times Hong Kong journalist Joey Dong said in a Wednesday article that China’s new communist regime-inspired fashion is “cool,” adding that Chinese Communist Party leader Xi Jinping has become a “fashion influencer.”

The article described how young people in the giant country began to adopt the clothing style of civil servants, which included donning “communist pins”, and labeled this new fashion genre “a pre-communist version of the Communist Party look”.

Dong also said that this phenomenon of communist influence “reflects China’s conservative political transformation.”

The reporter opens her dive into communist-influenced fashion by describing the overall look. “A dull blue jacket, big trousers, a Communist Party pin with a red hint on the chest, a small bag on the hand. This is the usual clothing of a typical Chinese official, and it has been very different from the exterior. Many Chinese youths strive,” she wrote.

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The New York Times report that Chinese President Xi Jinping a "Fashion influencer" To encourage Chinese youth a "Communist"- Influenced fashion sense.

A New York Times report called Chinese President Xi Jinping a “fashion influencer” for urging Chinese youth to adopt a “communist”-influenced fashion sense.
(Ju Peng/Xinhua via Getty Images)

But now the look of the cadre is cool, Dong said.

She goes on to explain how the style began to take root, “On Chinese social media platforms where trendsetters trade fashion tips, young people – mostly men – have been sharing photos of themselves dressed as their middle-aged fathers who work in the Communist Party.” offices.”

“They call the trend ‘Ting Ju Feng’ or ‘office and office style’ – which means the work clothes of a typical middle-class bureaucrat,” Dong added, before noting that China’s top leader now doubles as the country’s top official. “Fashion Influencers.”

“The epitome of this decidedly boring look is China’s supreme leader, Xi Jinping,” writes Dong, whose “countless” staff “now sport Mr. Xi’s favorite dark blue windbreaker.”

Dong wrote: “Despite his enormous power, Mr Xi is not seen as a fashion influencer – until now.”

The report describes what some people consider this new style to be “tongue in cheek” and a mockery of “China’s age of conformity”. A career path and a respectable lifestyle.

Dong described it as “a preview version of the Communist Party.”

The report goes on to describe how support for this communist style grew in the country. “On Xiaohongshu,” Dong wrote on a Chinese social media and e-commerce website, “trending hashtags collected more than five million views. Young civil servants posted their daily looks, and students posted selfies in the cadre. – Dressing. “

New York Times reporter Joy Dong wrote about it "nice" New fashion styles in China influenced how communist bureaucrats dressed.  (AP Photo/Andy Wong, Poole)

New York Times reporter Joey Dong wrote about a “cool” new fashion style in China that influenced the dress of communist bureaucrats. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, Poole)

“Some young women are also showing off the style of their civil servant boyfriends. Kanye clothing sellers are starting to include the ‘office style’ label in their online ads for clothes usually bought by middle-aged men,” he said. “The unabashedly casual look reflects China’s conservative political shift.”

Dong revealed some good points for this style, saying that Xi’s “signature blue jacket echoes the Mao suit worn by many Chinese, especially officials, before commercial fashion and Western clothing took off in China in the 1980s.” “

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A Times piece recently cited advice from Chinese fashion bloggers such as Hu Zhen, saying in a social media video that “‘office style’ is sending an unspoken message of being trustworthy, stable, and free of fierce competition.”

For those who want to use the method to continue professionally, “Mr. Hu suggested wearing a short-sleeved white shirt with a large notebook in his chest pocket, which is a handy tool for public servants to conduct field visits,” Dong wrote.

The report also added, “So far, no government media has openly encouraged the trend among young people, but if they did, it would not be surprising. The government strictly monitors all youth culture online, blurring tattoo images and revising lyrics. Negative connotations.”

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A New York Times report points out that the origins of this new communist fashion style can be found in the clothing of former Chinese Communist dictator Mao Zedong.

A New York Times report points out that the origins of this new communist fashion style can be found in the clothing of former Chinese Communist dictator Mao Zedong.
(AP)

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